Aesthetics of Everywhere

The urban scene, its people and processes. Based in southern California.

Archive for the ‘cycling’ Category

CicLAvia Takes to the Streets

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CicLAvia’s “Iconic Wilshire Boulevard” event this Sunday brought the masses out to Wilshire Boulevard on foot, bikes, skateboards, and even some creative ‘freak bikes’ to see their city streets in a new way: without its usual stream of cars. The six miles of Wilshire blocked off to cars and opened to people became the stage for spontaneous activity, crowds drifting between music and food vendors and art, families lounging on the lawns and people-watching.

CicLAvia 2014 Wilshire Boulevard

I’m fully supportive of these open streets events, modeled off of Bogotá, Colombia’s successful and recurring Ciclovía event (it happens weekly – can you believe it?). I loved being able to volunteer during Santa Barbara’s own version of it, SB Open Streets, which took place for the first time in November 2013, and it was inspiring to witness another such event close to home. CicLAvia, a larger event that has now been running for four years, has two more events planned for this year: “Heart of LA” on October 5th and “South LA” on December 7th.

Written by Crystal Bae

April 6th, 2014 at 8:34 pm

Los Angeles, First Take

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Reached Los Angeles on the day after Thanksgiving – a rainy one – after two days of riding from Santa Barbara. Adam and I had decided on a short Thanksgiving weekend bike tour since we finally had a chunk of free time off from work and school. Despite the rain, which left us thoroughly drenched by the time we reached LA, we enjoyed being back in the saddle and exploring new places on the California coast.

Day 1, clouds

Trail along the beach in LA

Entering Los Angeles via the Strand trail from Will Rogers Beach past Santa Monica was as relaxing as any weekend bike ride. We rode along a mixed-use path that cut right through the beach – no need to deal with traffic other than the occasional brave jogger. The path itself continues further south for a total of 22 miles in length, but we headed in towards downtown once we got to Venice. The mix of rain and sand led to lots of accumulated grime on our bikes, but the wet day also meant very light traffic once we got back to on-street riding.

It was neat wandering around Koreatown in the afternoon (eventually the rain did lighten up), as it was my first time visiting LA and because I’d been missing easy access to good Korean restaurants. We also enjoyed trying a selection of pastries from the local panaderias. It’s true that LA’s Koreatown is home to about as many Mexican immigrants as Koreans, and apparent when you walk around the neighborhood. Some streets have more Spanish-language signage while others are dominated by hangul. A vibrant neighborhood overall, with lively street life and families with young children walking around in the evening. We did also see a little bit of downtown in the early morning, though I’m sure we’ll be back to see more soon.

Entering Koreatown LA

Written by Crystal Bae

December 9th, 2013 at 5:41 pm

Volunteering with Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition

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I wanted to do a quick write-up on what it’s like to volunteer with the Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (SB Bike) since we’ve had a great time working with this organization over the past couple of months. SB Bike is involved with bicycle advocacy work and is an incredible part of the community here. Bici Centro is the leg of SB Bike that operates as a community bike shop, teaching people how to fix up their bikes and refurbishing donated bikes. You can volunteer or work on your own bike during the Bici Centro open shop hours. Volunteers share their know-how and almost every tool you might need is on hand.

Bici Centro Open Shop

There are other ways to volunteer as well: joining in advocacy efforts like working towards new bike lanes; checking bikes at the valet for Santa Barbara Bowl events; educating youth about bike safety; and helping out at various special events listed on the SB Bike calendar.

Last weekend, SB Bike was out at the first (annual?) Santa Barbara Open Streets event, tabling with information about bike resources and advocacy in Santa Barbara. Open Streets is a worldwide project – modeled off of the weekly Ciclovía in Bogotá, Colombia – to close streets to motorized traffic for a day and take in the pleasure of people-powered movement. Bici Centro was also set up at Open Streets, helping with quick mechanical fixes for riders.

SB Bike at Santa Barbara Open Streets

This weekend, SB Bike hosted a volunteer appreciation barbecue in its backyard space. SB Bike loves its volunteers and definitely made us all feel recognized – with live music, great food, bike-related giveaways, and a fire for all to gather ’round. This is a great city for cycling that’s only getting better. If you want to get involved in the cycling community in Santa Barbara, check out the website for the Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition at www.sbbike.org.

Written by Crystal Bae

November 10th, 2013 at 10:38 am

Bicycle Commuting in Goleta and Santa Barbara

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The past few weeks, I’ve been getting to know my way around Goleta and downtown Santa Barbara by bicycle. There is a lot of cycling infrastructure in place, including prominently marked bicycle routes – such as the Cross Town Route, Foothill Route, or Coast Route – as well as bike lanes on many of the local streets.

Santa Barbara County bike map

As a newcomer to the area, I’ve found the Santa Barbara County Bike Map to be a great resource. It helps me decide to take one route over another based on availability of a bike lane or continuity with a signed route. It also shows a bit of topography, which is useful when you’re trying to avoid strenuous climbs, of which there aren’t really any between Goleta and Santa Barbara unless you detour into the foothills. (Or if you’re seeking out climbs, as some are apt to do.)

My commute has been cut from a 15-mile bike ride to a sub-2-mile ride, making it a bit too short, so I’m hoping I’ll be able to fit longer rides into my schedule. We’ve been asking around and local cyclists have recommended a few fun rides for us to try out sometime: the climb up the old San Marcos Road, the climb up Gibraltar Road, the ride up to Lake Casitas and Ojai. Can you see a theme here? We’ll definitely be getting our climbing legs living in California.

Written by Crystal Bae

August 31st, 2013 at 6:52 pm

Bike Tour by the Numbers

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Here’s our summer bicycle tour, by the numbers. We like to keep tallies of various things that help us remember the good times along with the bad. Feel free to ask about details!

Overall
4,651 miles bicycled
131,138 feet of climbing – almost 25 miles of elevation gain
88 days on the road
53 nights of camping
19 nights staying with friends and family
12 nights with Warm Showers hosts
3 nights at a hostel or motel
12 rest days
5 days of riding with high temperature of at least 100°F
61 miles on an average day of riding
25 miles ridden on our shortest day
88 miles ridden on our longest day
10 pounds lost per person over duration of tour
93 pounds, weight of Adam’s bicycle fully-loaded
80 pounds, weight of Crystal’s bicycle fully-loaded

Bike Maintenance
8 flat tubes
3 tires worn out
3 chains replaced
1 bottom bracket replaced (Adam’s)
1 faulty cleat screw (mine)

Costs
Generally our biggest trip expenses were lodging and food. Tent sites at campgrounds were more expensive until we hit the coast, when hiker/biker sites for $5 per person became abundant. We weren’t paying rent at the time, and the entire trip cost us less than we normally spent on Washington, DC rent.
$47.36 spent per day, or $23.68 per person per day
$15.93 average cost of camping for two

Food
29 ounces of cooking gas used
9 batches of bagels baked
11 jars of peanut butter eaten
17 waffles consumed – and countless pancakes
43 scoops of ice cream enjoyed
150 beers drank
1/2 loaf of bread stolen from camp by raccoons

Miscellanea
63 showers each – hey, we were usually camping
32 ounces of sunblock applied
4 awesome cyclists met on Muskegon-Milwaukee ferry
4 thunderstorms – all in Montana
2 test rides on fellow cyclists’ rigs

Written by Crystal Bae

August 23rd, 2013 at 9:31 pm

Arrival: An End and a Beginning

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Our bike tour that took us across the country from Washington, DC and down the west coast came to a close yesterday, as we picked up the keys to our new apartment. We’re now living in Goleta, California, which is home to UC Santa Barbara and a short bike ride into downtown Santa Barbara.

We’re going to miss the life of bicycle touring: meeting new people everyday and striking up conversation everywhere, juggling the tasks of keeping ourselves fed and our bikes running smoothly and our devices charged, falling asleep exhausted to the lingering scent of our fellow travelers’ campfires. I almost feel spoiled now by electric light, the ability to turn on a faucet for clean water anytime, and a fixed roof over our heads. But I’m thankful for it, and I don’t think I’ll take these things for granted again.

Living on the road for three months has taught me to think on my feet and be flexible with our plans. It’s shown us that it’s possible to cover huge distances through our own strength and perseverance, that each epic journey is composed of small efforts stacked up over time. It has also reinforced my impression that most people are good. Friends, family, and even family of friends that we’d never met before took us in graciously and became our connection to home. And our friends back home never stopped sending their encouragement. With a lot of time to think while pedaling for hours daily, every kind word was repeated over and over again. I missed you all.

I often told people we met that we were moving by bicycle so that we would have the time to see everything in between. Traveling a distance by bike really shrinks it to human scale. DC to Pittsburgh felt like a long trip, then it wasn’t. It became a gravel trail, a week of camping, and a few inspiring conversations. When we entered Montana, we were amazed at the claim that crossing the state east-west was comparable to riding from New York City to Chicago. But for us it was really two weeks on the bike riding through gorgeous scenery and staying with wonderful folks who took us in before they knew us. That’s what travel does: it makes a place comprehensible, personal, and, for a short time, yours.

Written by Crystal Bae

August 20th, 2013 at 1:34 pm

Sunnier Days

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It’s a bittersweet feeling as our trip comes to a close. We’re trying our best to savor every moment, while looking forward with anticipation to our next stage in life. We tell everyone we meet we’re almost there, and each new day brings us nearer to Santa Barbara. Now we look at our destination on a map and it doesn’t seem so far, especially compared to how far we’ve come already.

Watching seals play

Over the past few days, the colder coastal weather has been slowly warming up, with more hours of sunlight with each passing day. We stop often, to watch seals play or have a roadside snack or talk to other travelers. Bike paths are becoming more common, and we appreciate each one. Yesterday we passed huge strawberry farms with busloads of migrant workers listening to the radio as they worked in the heat of the day. Dusty roads greeted us with the aroma of strawberries. I saw my first field of artichokes – never imagined the plants looked the way they do. It’s nice to be out learning about the world first-hand.

Nice CA bike path

Big vista

We’ve had several big climbs that reward us with big vistas. Big Sur was a nice climb. A passing road cyclist cheered our effort. A morning climb today between Gorda and Ragged Point was a perfect start to the day, which is warming up quickly. The first half of the day is usually still blanketed by the marine layer, though. We have to run our headlights and taillights to be seen while riding, as we can barely see the road ahead of us ourselves.

Morning marine layer

Written by Crystal Bae

August 17th, 2013 at 3:08 pm

Choose the Path of Switchbacks

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Discovery of the day: Along California’s Route 1 between Pacifica and the new Tom Lantos tunnel, you can choose to ride this path of tightly stacked switchbacks. It’s a gentle grade and quite meditative to ride up this way, though it won’t save you any time versus continuing on Route 1. Heading south on 1, just turn right onto Rockaway Beach Avenue and left into a parking area that leads to the path.

Switchbacks alongside Route 1

The above photo is a view from the top, and you can see Route 1 on the right. It’s worth reclaiming a moment of calm on your ride.

Written by Crystal Bae

August 14th, 2013 at 11:44 pm

Entering San Francisco

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Today we made it into San Francisco! This was the eleventh straight day of hilly riding on the west coast without a break – though we’ve decided to take a needed rest day tomorrow.

This morning we continued our ride up and down through Marin County.

Riding in Marin County, CA

Hilly Marin County

In the early afternoon, our friend Maya caught up with us on Route 1 and guided us to her place in the city. We took a coffee break in the touristy Sausalito, then waited for a few minutes amidst the hubbub of tourists on the Golden Gate Bridge until 3:30, when the west side of the bridge opens for cyclist-only passage. Navigating the east side looked much too chaotic, with tourists shakily riding rental bikes and abruptly stopping everywhere to take photos.

San Francisco is hillier than I remember it from a family trip ten years ago; the grade of some of these busy streets seems to defy logic. Yet buildings sit, positioned at angles to the streets and sidewalks, while drivers zoom up, cyclists trudge by, and streetcar lines trace the grey skies.

2 Girl Roaster - Coffee Break

Cycling in San Francisco

Pockets of the city do see some sun, though often too briefly.

Cycling in San Francisco

Written by Crystal Bae

August 13th, 2013 at 12:58 am

Cycling the Avenue of the Giants

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Avenue of the Giants, a 30-mile stretch of scenic road that parallels 101, redeemed what had otherwise been a tiresome stretch of riding. Our morale was wearing thin after days of riding a shoulder alongside inattentive (or inexperienced?) RV drivers, and even the pleasure of riding through the northern part of Redwood National Park was dampened by the cold, wet weather.

When we turned off 101 to ride onto Avenue of the Giants, however, the skies opened up to let some sunlight in and the coast redwoods made their majesty clear. We meandered along the various paths, taking our time along the redwood groves and reading the signposts. The ranger station even offered free coffee. It’s always the little things you really appreciate on a big trip.

Cycling through Avenue of the Giants

Written by Crystal Bae

August 11th, 2013 at 9:27 pm