Aesthetics of Everywhere

The urban scene, its people and processes. Based in southern California.

Archive for the ‘california’ tag

Errandonnee 2015

with 3 comments

I know our “winter” here is very different from winter in DC, but hey, the Errandonnee Challenge is open to all! Judging by everyone else’s photos and entries so far, the errandonnee is a great way to herald the coming of spring. Here’s my write-up from this year’s challenge. This isn’t so much a “challenge” as a pleasant way to work more utilitarian riding into your week while connecting with bike-minded people all over the country (and the world?). Ride your bike to complete at least 12 errands in 12 days. Simple, right?

Onto my entry for 2015.

Thursday, March 5, 2015 | Category: Store
Took an extended lunch break to ride 5.9 miles to the bike shop. Had to get my derailleur tuned up after an unsuccessful (but not horrendous) attempt to fix it myself. Bikes seem to take a beating when transported often in a trailer alongside many other bikes.

Three Pickles in Goleta, CA Cyclists on Goleta Beach

Continue onto the rest…

Written by Crystal Bae

March 17th, 2015 at 10:16 pm

Road Trip to Big Sur

with 2 comments

A great weekend trip up north to Big Sur, a scenic part of the central California coast where I had last been on the bike trip with Adam. It was definite change to see things from inside a car, with the tight curves of the Pacific Coast Highway passing in a blur. I was both pleased to see other cyclists enjoying this beautiful stretch of coastline and anxious about how little space they really had on the road, with a constant stream of fast-moving cars and motorcyclists enjoying the drive. To be honest, I’m not sure I’d ride the PCH again on a bicycle, at least not on a busy weekend.

Big Sur Panorama

Big Sur is an interesting area. The first time we passed through we couldn’t figure out when we were actually in Big Sur. The signage seems to disagree on what bounds the region. There’s a little community that calls itself “Big Sur” toward the northern reach of Big Sur, but the region continues quite a bit further south along the PCH. The shift in landscape is very apparent as you leave Big Sur, however.

We hiked through stands of coastal redwoods and set up a miniature tent city at our site. With the decreasing daylight, we donned headlamps and finished cooking dinner into the darkness. We consumed close to twenty heads of garlic in one meal (almost 2 heads of garlic per person). An early start that morning, a good uphill hike, and 10 o’clock quiet hours meant we were all in our tents with plenty of time to sleep off the long day.

Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park is a great choice if you’re looking to camp in the area. It’s popular but large enough to accommodate hundreds of people, and offers hiking trails in walking distance of your site.

Big Sur Redwoods

Valley Trail Hike in Big Sur

Big Sur Waterfall

In the evening, we took time out to admire the stars. You can see so many out there.

Written by Crystal Bae

October 6th, 2013 at 8:35 pm

Choose the Path of Switchbacks

without comments

Discovery of the day: Along California’s Route 1 between Pacifica and the new Tom Lantos tunnel, you can choose to ride this path of tightly stacked switchbacks. It’s a gentle grade and quite meditative to ride up this way, though it won’t save you any time versus continuing on Route 1. Heading south on 1, just turn right onto Rockaway Beach Avenue and left into a parking area that leads to the path.

Switchbacks alongside Route 1

The above photo is a view from the top, and you can see Route 1 on the right. It’s worth reclaiming a moment of calm on your ride.

Written by Crystal Bae

August 14th, 2013 at 11:44 pm

Blue Skies in San Francisco

with one comment

The sun actually came out today in San Francisco, making it an easy decision to walk over for the park to picnic away the afternoon, soak up vitamin D, and wander through the de Young Museum. We spent time catching up with friends who are both former DC residents and new residents to SF, having lived here less than a year each. I love discussing differences in lifestyle from east coast city living versus west coast city living. There’s much more homelessness here, some of it voluntary.

The Lawn Bowling Club was out, playing what looked to me like bocce. The signs, however, forbade playing bocce on the lawn bowling greens – so there must be some major difference. They invited us to come learn how to play during their free lesson tomorrow, but we’re back on the road then.

San Francisco Lawn Bowling

The view from the observation deck of the de Young Museum was improved by the lack of fog that is quintessential San Francisco. We could see all the populated streets fanning out on the hillsides.

View from the de Young observation deck

The museum was designed by the prominent architects Herzog & de Meuron and I felt that the building was as much on display as the collections of art. In the cafe courtyard, people were out soaking up the sun.

De Young Museum Cafe Courtyard

We made sure, of course, to eat enough Mexican food to fuel us for the last few days of our trip. Continuing south tomorrow, hopefully with fresh legs!

Written by Crystal Bae

August 14th, 2013 at 2:05 am

Entering San Francisco

with 3 comments

Today we made it into San Francisco! This was the eleventh straight day of hilly riding on the west coast without a break – though we’ve decided to take a needed rest day tomorrow.

This morning we continued our ride up and down through Marin County.

Riding in Marin County, CA

Hilly Marin County

In the early afternoon, our friend Maya caught up with us on Route 1 and guided us to her place in the city. We took a coffee break in the touristy Sausalito, then waited for a few minutes amidst the hubbub of tourists on the Golden Gate Bridge until 3:30, when the west side of the bridge opens for cyclist-only passage. Navigating the east side looked much too chaotic, with tourists shakily riding rental bikes and abruptly stopping everywhere to take photos.

San Francisco is hillier than I remember it from a family trip ten years ago; the grade of some of these busy streets seems to defy logic. Yet buildings sit, positioned at angles to the streets and sidewalks, while drivers zoom up, cyclists trudge by, and streetcar lines trace the grey skies.

2 Girl Roaster - Coffee Break

Cycling in San Francisco

Pockets of the city do see some sun, though often too briefly.

Cycling in San Francisco

Written by Crystal Bae

August 13th, 2013 at 12:58 am